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Books and CDs

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    Kriol Language Version with English Language guide. A puppetry project and book by Wugularr children and community. BuwaBori (River Boy) is the story of a boy and a river. One day the river became dirty, so the boy decided that he needed to find out why. So he walked and he walked, following the water. As he walked animals and spirits appeared to help him and guide him on his way.
    The artwork for River Boy was created at Wugularr School with the 5/6 class and at Ghunmarn Culture Centre with members of Djilpin Arts.

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    The bestselling story of a real-life Crocodile Dundee. the bestselling story of a real-life Crocodile Dundee. In this remarkable memoir, tom Cole tells the stories of his life in the outback during the 1920s and 1930s. With great humour and drama, he recounts his adventures as a drover and stockman in the toughest country in Australia and later on as a buffalo shooter and crocodile hunter in the Northern territory before the war. First published in 1988 and having sold over 100 000 copies, Hell West and Crooked is perfect for anyone who enjoys a classic outback yarn. 'A real-life story of the pioneering days of the top End that out-adventures anything fiction writers could hope to produce.' - tHE WESt AUStRALIAN 'tom Cole is a living legend, a real-life Crocodile Dundee. His stories paint a vivid picture of wild and exciting times in the Australian outback.' - MELBOURNE SUNDAY EXPRESS 'A story of the outback and cattlemen and women, stripped of glamour, that will become an Australian classic to rub covers with authors like Ion Idriess.' - GOLD COASt BULLEtIN
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    "Kakadu" DVD

    $35.00

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    "Kakadu" DVD

    $35.00

    KAKADU is a world television first: a unique innovation in nature documentary. Driven by the passion and dedication of traditional owners and park rangers, you embark on a first time journey behind the scenes of a natural universe. Through the eyes of the rangers, the scientists and traditional owners who give their lives to KAKADU comes a new understanding of living things, but also a deep insight into the elemental power of nature at dramatic extremes.
    Filmed over 12 intense months KAKADU is powerful, primal action in a world beyond time. It’s where man meets wild and nature calls the shots.

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    Rembarrnga Language Version with English Language guide. A puppetry project and book by Wugularr children and community. BuwaBori (River Boy) is the story of a boy and a river. One day the river became dirty, so the boy decided that he needed to find out why. So he walked and he walked, following the water. As he walked animals and spirits appeared to help him and guide him on his way.
    The artwork for River Boy was created at Wugularr School with the 5/6 class and at Ghunmarn Culture Centre with members of Djilpin Arts.

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    Limited edition volume celebrating 20 years of the Alice Springs Beanie Festival. Gorgeous full colour images show the fun of the festival and the details of fabulous beanies. Understand how the beanie has developed into a regional artform. Enjoy some of the beanies who won the People's Choice. Read snippets from some of the organisations and Central Desert communities with whom we work. Read about the beanie story and the gentle reconciliation possibilities that the festival offers.
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    The extraordinary story of the cyclone that destroyed Darwin on Christmas Eve 1974 - in the words the people who survived.
    Thirty years ago, on Christmas Day 1974, Australia woke up to the news that Darwin had been devastated by Cyclone Tracy.

    Only hours before, the town of Darwin was winding down for the holiday season. Like many people that day, Josephine Foreman spent the morning cooking a large turkey for Christmas lunch; Geoff Crane took the opportunity to finish some last-minute Christmas shopping. Reports of an approaching cyclone were taken lightly-after all, the last cyclone had been little more than a storm with a bit more wind. Besides, it was Christmas .

    At midnight on Christmas Eve, Cyclone Tracy roared in from the Arafura Sea and in six hours wiped out Darwin. It was Australia's worst natural disaster-a night of fear and horror, a storm of unprecedented savagery and destruction.

    Winds of 300 kilometres per hour totally destroyed nearly all of Darwin's buildings and caused the deaths of more than fifty people. When Christmas Day finally dawned, many counted themselves lucky to still be alive.

    Thirty years later, some of those who lived through the cyclone's devastation recall their frightening experiences-from the sheer terror of the storm itself, to the heart-wrenching days that followed and the mass clean-up operation and evacuation of more than 20,000 people in six days. This is a compelling account of tragedy, survival and human courage.
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