This work by Maningrida artist Susan Marawarr depicts emblems and totems used to decorate the Lorrkkon.
This work by Maningrida artist Susan Marawarr depicts emblems and totems used to decorate the Lorrkkon.
This work by Maningrida artist Susan Marawarr depicts emblems and totems used to decorate the Lorrkkon.
This work by Maningrida artist Susan Marawarr depicts emblems and totems used to decorate the Lorrkkon.

Susan Marawarr, Lorrkkon, screen print on linen, 2m

BABB0001

Regular price $440.00
1 in stock

This work by Maningrida artist Susan Marawarr depicts emblems and totems used to decorate the Lorrkkon. The Lorrkkon or hollow-log coffin ceremony is the final ceremony in a sequence of mortuary rituals celebrated by the people of Arnhem Land. This ceremony might take place many years after the person has died, and involves the placing of the deceased’s bones into a hollow log that is decorated with painted clan designs and ceremonially placed into the ground where it slowly decays over many years.

BIOGRAPHY

Susan Marawarr is a leading textile artist who has been working with Bábbarra Designs since 2001. She has strong artistic family connections, being the daughter of Anchor Kulunba and Mary Marabamba, and the sister of acclaimed bark painters James Iyuna and John Mawurndjul. Marawarr is an accomplished printmaker, sculptor, weaver and bark painter. She collaborated with Waanyi artist Judy Watson for Watson’s public art commission of bronze fish fences and dillybags installed at Sydney International Airport, and toured the USA with Bush Colour, promoting the work of female printmakers.

BABBARRA WOMEN'S CENTRE

Bábbarra Women’s Centre enables local women to develop and run women-centred enterprises that support healthy and sustainable livelihoods.

Bábbarra Designs is their main enterprise. They run a textile workshop specialising in the production of hand-printed fabric design, as well as a skilled sewing team and are one of only a few Indigenous textile-producing art centres in Australia that design, print and sew product onsite, in community.

Bábbarra Women’s Centre is governed by women for women, led by the strong voices of our Bábbarra Women’s Board. In this space, women are in charge. 

Bábbarra Women’s Centre is part of Bawinanga Aboriginal Corporation, which was set up by Maningrida community leaders in 1974 to support people to live on their homelands.

For more information visit www.babbarra.com